CONTACT

Anne Pearce (Headteacher)
Woodeaton Manor School,
Woodeaton,
Oxfordshire,
OX3 9TS

Tel: 01865 558722

Parents & Carers Meetings

On the 2nd Monday of every half term parents and carers are invited to attend a session covering a range of topics.
Meetings usually start at 7pm with refreshments provided.

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English

Aims

At Woodeaton, throughout key stages 2, 3 and 4, we are totally and wholeheartedly committed to activating an enthusiasm in our pupils for English. It is the key to success. We seek to share an understanding of its vital importance in everyday life, and aim to provide our pupils with the English skills that they need to be capable and creative speakers, listeners, readers and writers.

Teaching Methods

We seek to gain a comprehensive understanding of our pupil’s prior experiences. For many these experiences may be centered around, low self-esteem, lack of confidence, isolation and failure and may present as a range of physical, sensory, perceptual and emotional needs.

We recognise that skilled and committed teachers and a pupil’s desire to learn are the keys to learning.

In order to activate an enthusiasm for English

  • We harness our own expertise and enthusiasm for the subject
  • Provide appropriate and stimulating materials, which are respectful of the individual and cover a range of learning styles
  • Provide appropriate support, encouragement and praise
  • Address each pupil’s literacy needs.

 

Pupils are encouraged in all responses, and are continually assessed by their teacher using:

  • Information from observing, listening to and talking with pupils in lessons
  • Self and peer assessment during lessons,
  • Self- assessment at the end of a module of work.
  • Pupils regularly receive feedback on their work.

 

Teachers also assess pupils formally throughout the key stage and return assessment judgements to the deputy headteacher three times per year.


Interventions

Pupils are assessed on entry by our Educational Psychologist. If a pupil’s literacy levels are significantly lower than their chronological age, they will require a targeted programme to increase these. This may include 1:1, paired or small group workoutside of the classroom for a specified period of time. 

We have a teacher trained in the recognition and support of Dyslexic pupils who can devise a programme of support. In addition the teacher of English will incorporate specific targets into the pupils IEP.

Curriculum and Resources
 

Year 7 Scheme of Work Overview

Autumn 1

Baseline assessment.

Novel- select from:

‘Two Weeks with the Queen’

‘Journey to the River Sea’

‘ Skellig’

‘ Holes’

EN2 Reading

SPAG

Autumn 2

Writing Styles: Fiction and Non Fiction

EN3 Writing

SPAG

Spring 1

Poetry Forms including Ballads

‘The Highwayman’

EN 2 Reading

SPAG

Spring 2

Grammar for writing: Creative.

EN 3 Writing

SPAG

Summer 1

Introduction to Shakespeare. Playscripts: Macbeth or other

EN2 Reading

SPAG

Summer 2

Grammar for Writing: Non Fiction EN3 Writing and Spoken Language

SPAG

 

Skills Development & Expected Progress:

In Year 7 students will develop their skills in reading through exploration of a range of texts from a modern novel, poetry, short non-fiction texts to a Shakespeare play. They will learn to write narrative fiction, autobiographical writing and news articles. They will also develop their understanding of poetry and create their own poems. They will improve their confidence and competence in Spoken English.

Literacy: Teacher’s will ensure there is a strong element of SPaG within their teaching. This will be dependent on the needs of the pupils they are teaching.

Assessment: Initially baseline assessment is undertaken in the first half of the Autumn term. This is a formal assessment whenever this is possible. Where it is not possible to formally assess the pupil, an alternative assessment will be completed which will demonstrate why this is not possible. Formative assessment occurs throughout the year and summative assessment takes place towards the end of the Autumn, Spring and Summer terms, to inform the school of progress.

Numeracy: Syllables and rhythm in poetry.

ICT: Students will have opportunities to use the class computers or access the computer suite for contextual research and re-drafting of written work.

Life in Modern Britain: Students will be considering social issues relevant to life in modern Britain, including attitudes towards gender and race, throughout their study.

SMSC: Spiritual: Students will develop their imagination and creativity in their poetry creation. Moral: Students will be debating the use of stereotypes in their study of the novel. Social: Students will be working in pairs occasionally to develop their empathy and team-work skills. Cultural: Students will be learning about Shakespeare and his place in the literary heritage.

Meeting the needs of individual students & additional support: All lessons are differentiated to challenge and support all students. Students with specific learning needs are often supported by the additional adult in the classroom and through intervention sessions.

Independent Study/ Homework: There is a policy of no homework in Woodeaton Manor School. However, liaison between staff, pupils and parents may enable some tasks to be completed outside of school times. This may be in the form of catching up on work missed, reading in preparation for a lesson, research of context and author, accessing a website for revision purposes.

Resources: All resources are provided by class teachers. The libraries and computer suites are available by liaison for students to use for independent study.
 

Year 8 Scheme of Work Overview

Autumn 1

Gothic Genre: including ‘Dracula’ play script, extracts from Edgar Allen Poe, Mary Shelley and non fiction texts.

EN2 Reading

SPAG

Autumn 2

Gothic Genre: grammar for speaking and writing creatively.

EN3 Writing

SPAG

Spring 1

Poetry: Conflict

EN 2 Reading

SPAG

Spring 2

Media: grammar for speaking and writing non fiction.

EN 3 Writing

SPAG

Summer 1

Novel. Face or Stonecold

EN2 Reading

SPAG

Summer 2

Grammar for Writing: Non Fiction EN3 Writing

SPAG

 

Skills Development & Expected Progress:

In Year 8 students will build on their reading skills, developing the skill of analysis through their reading of texts such as Stonecold by Robert Swindells and the play Dracula by David Calcutt. They will also build on their writing skills, through persuasive speech writing, descriptive writing and narrative writing. They will continue to improve their confidence and competence in Spoken English.

Literacy: Teacher’s will ensure there is a strong element of SPaG within their teaching. This will be dependent on the needs of the pupils they are teaching.

Assessment: Formative assessment occurs throughout the year and this is fed back to pupils orally and via the marking of their work. Summative assessment takes place towards the end of the Autumn, Spring and Summer terms, to inform the school, parents and pupils of progress.

Numeracy: Venn diagram for comparison. Roman numerals /chapter numbers. Poetry rhyme schemes eg ABABCC

ICT: Students will have opportunities to use the class computers or access the computer suite for contextual research and re-drafting of written work.

Life in Modern Britain: Students will be considering social issues relevant to life in modern Britain (particularly poverty and society, crime, education and health – with a focus on 19th C life during the study of Dracula and on 20th C life during the study of Stonecold.

SMSC: Spiritual: Students will develop their imagination and creativity in their creative writing. Moral: Students will be debating moral and ethical issues in their study of Dracula and Stonecold Social: Students will think about biased language and social issues in their persuasive speeches, in role in Hot Seat activities. Cultural: Students will be researching and reading extracts of a significant member of English literary heritage – Charles Dickens/ Mary Shelley.

Meeting the needs of individual students & additional support: All lessons are differentiated to challenge and support all students. Students with specific learning needs are often supported by the additional adult in the classroom and through intervention sessions.

Resources: All resources are provided by class teachers. The libraries and computer suites are available by liaison for students to use for independent study.


Year 9: Scheme of Work Overview

Autumn 1

Modern Text Study: Of Mice and Men

EN2 Reading.

SPAG

Autumn 2

GCSE Writing Imaginatively and Creatively.

EN3 Writing

SPAG

Spring 1

Poetry: GCSE Anthology

EN 2 Reading

SPAG

Spring 2

Non Fiction Reading and Writing Skills.

EN 3 Writing

SPAG

Summer 1

Shakespeare GCSE text.

EN2 Reading

SPAG

Summer 2

GCSE Writing skills and controlled assessments.

EN3 Writing

SPAG

 

Skills Development & Expected Progress:

In Year 9 students develop their analytical reading skills further through the study of poetry, Shakespeare and fiction. They will also enhance their ability to write persuasively and descriptively. Throughout the year, they will continue to improve their confidence and competence in Spoken English and will be made aware of the GCSE assessment focuses.

Literacy: Teacher’s will ensure there is a strong element of SPaG within their teaching. This will be dependent on the needs of the pupils they are teaching.

Assessment: Formative assessment occurs throughout the year and this is fed back to pupils orally and via the marking of their work. Summative assessment takes place towards the end of the Autumn, Spring and Summer terms, to inform the school, parents and pupils of progress. Discussion of GCSE grades will take place.

Numeracy: Venn diagram/table for comparison Character/narrative graphs

ICT: Students will have opportunities to use the class computers or access the computer suite for contextual research and re-drafting of written work.

Life in Modern Britain: Students will be considering social issues relevant to life in modern Britain (attitudes towards gender, race, prejudice, society and government) throughout their study.

SMSC: Spiritual: Through discussion of complex and emotional texts, pupils will develop their ability to reflect and respond imaginatively Moral: Study and discussion of love poems will develop students’ empathy and honesty Social: Encouraging positive peer relationships through class discussion and group and paired work. Cultural: Students will look at texts from a range of eras and cultures.

Meeting the needs of individual students, & additional support: All lessons are differentiated to challenge and support all students. Students with specific learning needs are often supported by the additional adult in the classroom and through intervention sessions.

Resources: All resources are provided by class teachers. The libraries and computer suites are available by liaison for students to use for independent study.
 

Functional Skills English

Functional Skills are qualifications which equip learners with the practical skills needed to live, learn and work successfully. Suitable for learners of all ages, they’re also a mandatory part of all apprenticeship frameworks in England.

Functional skills English, Levels 1 and 2, develop learner understanding and skills in the following:

 

  • Speaking, Listening and Communication – taking full part in formal and informal discussions and exchanges in a range of contexts, that include unfamiliar subjects. Developing effective presentation skills

 

  • Reading – read and understand a range of straightforward texts. Select, read and compare texts, using the information to form, ideas, arguments and opinions.

 

  • Writing – write a range of texts, including extended written documents, to communicate information, ideas and opinions, effectively and persuasively using formats and styles suitable for their purpose and audience.

 

Functional Skills English, Levels 1 & 2, complement the KS3 Programme of Study.

Reasons for taking Functional Skills English at Key Stage 3 or 4 might include:

  • providing a focus for learning essential skills, within a functional context
  • securing essential skills as a foundation for success at GCSE
  • introducing the skills and processes of examinations before GCSE work begins, along with experience of an external examination prior to GCSE
  • the attainment of a recognised qualification in the core subject of mathematics, with points equivalent to half a GCSE.
  • Life skills e.g completing job applications, selecting a holiday, writing a letter of complaint
  • Providing a sound foundation for the learner to build upon, in a further education environment

 

Depending on academic ability, we currently offer all levels of this qualification:

  • Entry Level 1
  • Entry Level 2
  • Entry Level 3
  • Level 1 – which equates to half a GCSE at Grades D/E
  • Level 2 – which equates to half a GCSE at Grade B


Source: http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-functional-skills/English.html#tab-0
 

GCSE English Language

Teachers: Mrs Holifield/ Ms Jenkins

Course: OCR, GCSE English Language, 9-1, J351
Duration: 2 years - Linear

First teaching from September 2015

 

What will I be doing on the course?

From September 2015 all pupils will be studying for the new GCSE English Language exam. It is compulsory to study this subject.

English Language is based entirely on unseen texts. This means that the texts pupils answer questions on in the exam will not be ones they have studied in class. Each exam contains two unseen texts that share a common theme. The first exam will contain two non- fiction texts and the second exam will contain two literary texts.

Pupils will not have prior knowledge of the unseen texts before the exam. Instead they will be expected to demonstrate the skills they have learnt throughout the course and apply these to the unseen texts. These skills include understanding information, analysing the effects of language use and comparing and evaluating texts.


Assessment

Pupils will have no controlled tasks to do throughout the course, but will have two [2 hour] exams to sit at the end of the second year.

Paper 1 is on non- fiction texts where reading and writing are assessed.

Paper 2 is on literary texts where reading and writing are assessed.

In addition there is a compulsory spoken language task where speaking and listening skills are assessed. Pupils receive a separate pass, merit or distinction grade for this part of the course. The pupils are required to give and answer questions on a spoken presentation of their choice. These will be video recorded.
 

What skills do I need to develop to be successful at this course?

This qualification focuses on developing reading skills, writing skills and speaking and listening skills


What could I use this qualification for?

GCSE English provides you with improved opportunities for further education, training and employment. Also, a good qualification in English is necessary for most careers.

A good command of the spoken and written word will help you every day- and will benefit your other GCSE subjects too. It will help you to:

  • Work independently
  • Be creative
  • Think critically
  • Communicate your ideas with confidence
  • Think logically

 

Additional Information

All pupils have to study this subject in Key Stage 4, continuing the courses they are already studying. Entry Level certification will be available for those pupils working below Grade 1. A grade 5, or above, in English is required to access a Level 2/3 college course after year 11 and to gain a place at university.


GCSE English Literature

Teachers: Mrs Holifield / Ms Jenkins

Course: OCR, GCSE English Literature 9-1, J352 
Duration: 2 Years – Linear

First teaching from September 2015

English Literature involves study of 19th century prose, poetry, a modern prose or drama text and a Shakespeare play. Our school selects texts from a short list provided by the exam board. These set texts are the ones pupils will be assessed on in the exams.


Assessment

Pupils will have no controlled tasks to do throughout the course, but will have two [2 hour] exams to sit at the end of the second year.

Each exam assesses pupil’s knowledge and understanding of two of the set texts.

Paper 1 is on modern prose or drama, and on 19th century prose.

Paper 2 is on poetry and a Shakespeare play.


What skills do I need to develop to be successful at this course?

This qualification focuses on developing knowledge and understanding of prose, poetry and drama texts.

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) in English Literature specification aims to encourage learners to read, engage critically with and to explore a wide range of literature; to develop and sustain confident, personal responses to their reading, using supporting textual evidence; to use accurate, effective writing skills; and enjoy a variety of texts across the major genres, including modern texts and texts from different cultures, as well as classic literature. Underpinned by a skills-based approach, the emphasis is on building learners’ confidence in developing and articulating a fresh, individual response to texts which are supported and justified.


What could I use this qualification for?

GCSE English Literature provides you with improved opportunities for further education, training and employment.

Additional Information

All pupils have to study this subject, at Woodeaton Manor School, in Key Stage 4, continuing the courses they are already studying. Entry Level certification will be available for those pupils working below Grade 1. A grade 5, or above, in English is required to access a Level 2/3 college course after year 11 and to gain a place at university.